Universe

Three New Planets in Habitable Area, what do we know about them?

In the search for Earth-like planets a group of astronomers close to our solar system several new bodies. Nearest is 39 light-years away and orbiting together with three possible candidates around dwarf star called Trappist-1. Whether there is life, we will find out “in our generation”.

Are we alone in the universe? The question is asked by mankind long in entertainment industry as well as astronomers. First prerequisite: where is nearest habitable world? And for some must come together: the temperatures must be moderate, there is liquid water, and the size should be comparable to that of the Earth to keep evolution on the similar path.

Eso-paranal-51

The discovery of one or the other existed in recent years, as the two planets Kepler-438 b and Kepler-442 b and the extra-solar planet GJ 1132 b, but the search is still after the famous needle in a haystack.

Small cool star with three planets more likely have atmosphere.

Now an international team of astronomers has found three of these needles: straight once 39 light years away there is a small cool star with a mass of approximately 8% and a luminosity of about 0.05% of the Sun revolve around the three celestial bodies. At a distance, measured the radiation of the star, offers the conditions for life.

This intriguing new view of a spectacular stellar nursery IC 2944 is being released to celebrate a milestone: 15 years of ESO’s Very Large Telescope. This image also shows a group of thick clouds of dust known as the Thackeray globules silhouetted against the pale pink glowing gas of the nebula. These globules are under fierce bombardment from the ultraviolet radiation from nearby hot young stars. They are both being eroded away and also fragmenting, rather like lumps of butter dropped onto a hot frying pan. It is likely that Thackeray’s globules will be destroyed before they can collapse and form new stars.
This intriguing new view of a spectacular stellar nursery IC 2944 is being released to celebrate a milestone: 15 years of ESO’s Very Large Telescope. This image also shows a group of thick clouds of dust known as the Thackeray globules silhouetted against the pale pink glowing gas of the nebula. These globules are under fierce bombardment from the ultraviolet radiation from nearby hot young stars. They are both being eroded away and also fragmenting, rather like lumps of butter dropped onto a hot frying pan. It is likely that Thackeray’s globules will be destroyed before they can collapse and form new stars.

The results of their research have published scientists under direction of Michaël Gillon of the Institut d’Astrophysique et geophysics at the University of Liège in Belgium early may in the journal “Nature”. The planet Trappist has even its own website where you can get an impression from the planet and State-of-the-art.