Engineering

Clausthal Engineers Control Machines with Cyber Gloves

How can machines in the industry 4.0 era I control? For example, with the CyberGlove from Clausthal. He has nerves of glass which can digitize the movements. To see he is on the CeBit in 2016 in Hanover. There, computer scientists show also a new app, the data spies unmasked.

How can machines in the industry 4.0 era I control? For example, with the CyberGlove from Clausthal. He has nerves of glass which can digitize the movements. To see he is on the CeBit in 2016 in Hanover. There, computer scientists show also a new app, the data spies unmasked.

The man moves his hand in the air, a robot hand performs the same movements in real time. This vision are engineers from the Institute for energy research and physical technologies at the Clausthal Technical University. On the world’s largest computer trade fair CeBit 2016, which will take place in Hannover from March 14 to 18, they show results: nerves of glass.

Engineered CyberGlove: Nerves glass with only 0.125 mm thick

The nerve from glass is an optical fiber with a diameter of only 0.125 mm. It is integrated in a glove, the so called CyberGlove, capture three-dimensional movements and sends them as control data to robots or drive elements. So far, this 3D Environmental Gloves with a single fibre was not possible to make, but only with three individual or complex multi core optical fibers. The nerves of glass have a lower mass and are more flexible, so that the researcher provide a variety of “new applications”, without specification are truly universal.

Smartphone apps engineered as data spies unmasked on Android devices

Also computer scientists of the University of the Saarland are on the CeBit. With the baggage they have TaintArtist, an app for Android smartphones. With their help, users can check whether suspicious apps are actually cancerous. “If an app says, what data she would like to have, then I not still know what it is doing so”, says researcher Oliver Schranz.

Oliver Schranz
Oliver Schranz at work: the computer scientist has developed an app, revealed the data spies. Photo: Oliver Dietze at Technical University Saarlandes

And indeed more than 88% of Android apps written for use in companies in any way spy as data, believed to be a recent study of the US security company Appthority.

App could prevent data espionage in company

TaintArtist is based on the method of the so-called taint tracking. An important privacy information app accesses, it comes to a mark – similar to a dye powder explosion between banknote bundles after a bank robbery. “So can we track precisely how the information flows in a suspicious app running”, SAK explained. In the case of abuse, the app then raises the alarm.

Schranz is convinced that the app will work particularly well in companies. “If employees there using their own devices, the company with our app can make sure that certain data do not leave the device.” But so far, it is unclear whether the app is actually a commercial product.